Dating special forces soldier

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"We've even seen where the crooks said that the Army won't allow the Soldier to access their personal bank accounts or credit cards," said Grey. "These perpetrators, often from other countries, most notably from West African countries, are good at what they do and quite familiar with American culture, but the claims about the Army and its regulations are ridiculous," said Grey. The ability of law enforcement to identify these perpetrators is very limited, so CID officials said individuals must stay on the alert and be personally responsible to protect themselves.

The Army reports that numerous very senior officers and enlisted Soldiers throughout the Army have had their identities stolen to be used in these scams. "Another critical issue is we don't want victims who do not report this crime walking away and thinking that a U. serviceman has ripped them off when in fact that serviceman is honorably serving his country and often not aware that his pictures or identity have been stolen," said Grey. Be extremely suspicious if you are asked for money for transportation costs, communication fees or marriage processing and medical fees.

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The perpetrators often tell the victims that their units do not have telephones or they are not allowed to make calls or they need money to "help keep the Army Internet running." They often say they are widowers and raising a young child on their own to pull on the heartstrings of their victims. "The criminals are preying on the emotions and patriotism of their victims," added Grey. , AOL," etc., routing accounts through numerous locations around the world, and using pay-per-hour Internet cyber cafes, which often times maintain no accountability of use.• Many of the negative claims made about the military and the supposed lack of support and services provided to troops overseas are far from reality -- check the facts.• Be very suspicious if you are asked to send money or ship property to a third party or company.Once victims are hooked, the criminals continue their ruse."We've even seen instances where the perpetrators are asking the victims for money to "purchase leave papers" from the Army, help pay for medical expenses from combat wounds received, or help pay for their flight home so they can leave the war zone," said Grey.

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